fergiedellorusso
"Shemale" is a term used to erase and invalidate a trans woman’s identity as a female or fetishize us. It’s not funny. Words like "tranny" and "shemale" are not funny or cute. They’re cruel and derisive. You’re no trans ally if you use them. "Trap" is a word created to imply that trans women are deceiving men for sex. It propagates the fear that gets us murdered. Trans people asking folks to stop using "tranny" isn’t censorship/word-policing. We’re just asking to not be verbally bashed.
jameythefoxx

deprincessed:

Magic Moments: One of the most iconic dresses from one of the most memorable shows to grace the world of fashion; Alexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2005 aptly named ‘It’s Only A Game”. The show featured a human chess game, inspired by the very one in 'Harry Potter and The Sorcerers Stone', and the models were dressed suitably as the chess pieces - my favourite being Gemma Ward as the queen. This was portrayed perfectly and to the extreme as she wore a magnificent creation; a balloon skirted lilac dress with a trailed obi-style sash made of silver brocade, and a silk faille flower embroidered jacket with structured shoulders. Completely unforgettable, forever extraordinary. photos via.

beremylovechild
beremylovechild:

This was such an important line to me. They never once used Angela as a black stereotype but they didn’t try to erase her identity as a black woman either. Nor did they make her being the black girl the only thing about her. She was quirky, wrote poetry, colored her hair and she cried. She was in equal measures strong and vulnerable. She was desired, full of insecurity and confidence. The only time any of the usual stereotypical TV troops about black women were brought into play they were used in a satirical way to make fun of how little the characters around her knew about being a Woc because they weren’t Woc and even then there was no hostility or alienation on either parts. Angela was a complex black girl, with complex relationships and a realistic personality/sense of identity and her character was just really important to me.

beremylovechild:

This was such an important line to me. They never once used Angela as a black stereotype but they didn’t try to erase her identity as a black woman either. Nor did they make her being the black girl the only thing about her. She was quirky, wrote poetry, colored her hair and she cried. She was in equal measures strong and vulnerable. She was desired, full of insecurity and confidence. The only time any of the usual stereotypical TV troops about black women were brought into play they were used in a satirical way to make fun of how little the characters around her knew about being a Woc because they weren’t Woc and even then there was no hostility or alienation on either parts. Angela was a complex black girl, with complex relationships and a realistic personality/sense of identity and her character was just really important to me.